8BitNiblit

Milk * Honey * Science

warmbug:

verticalvest:

when the crab loses its grape its so disappointed  :(

IT JSUT KEEPS PRETENDING TO eAET IM LAIGHING WHO DOES THAT??? I DONT BELIEVE THIS. I LOVE CRABS. I CANT BELIEVE IT. IM SO INSPIRED. NEXT TIME I DROP FOOD ON THE FLOOR IM GOING TO CONTINUE EATING AS IF I STILL HAVE FOOD

(via fatpeoplemakemehappy)

turecepcja:

Steven Hughes

Steven Hughes is an illustrator and storyteller. He creates a mood with his work, often with a conceptual twist to an otherwise normal seeming environment.

Steven received his BAA in Illustration at Sheridan College, is the co-host of the podcast ‘Magenta Manor' and creator of the comic 'Traded Stars.’ Besides illustration, he enjoys traveling, reading and spending time with his faithful companion, Bixby (the dog).

(via blacksheepboy-)

emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins: Key question is really what is the healthy range?

(Source: mrgn)

milkstudios:

MLK
"If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way."

milkstudios:

MLK

"If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way."

scienceyoucanlove:


A Pen That 3-D Prints Bone Right Onto Patients


The device could eventually let surgeons apply stem cells more directly 
One of the greatest promises of 3-D printing is that we’ll one day be able to print organs on-demand. Need a new liver? There it is, at the push of a button.
Anticipating that future, scientists from the University of Wollongong in Australia have created the BioPen, a tool that lets physicians more or less draw new bones on peoplethrough 3-D printing. The pen is loaded with so-called “stem cell ink,” a batch of human cells that can form new bone. Another second substance, a polymer, then seals the area so the stem cells can do their work in peace. You can see why this is promising: if someone loses parts of bone in an accident, a tool like this pen could apply a fix directly to the problem area.
We’ve seen 3-D printed bones before, actually, but this device could give a little more precision. It’s yet to undergo clinical testing, so it still may be a while before it hits the market, but if and when it does, it’ll have some company. 
source

scienceyoucanlove:

A Pen That 3-D Prints Bone Right Onto Patients

The device could eventually let surgeons apply stem cells more directly 

One of the greatest promises of 3-D printing is that we’ll one day be able to print organs on-demand. Need a new liver? There it is, at the push of a button.

Anticipating that future, scientists from the University of Wollongong in Australia have created the BioPen, a tool that lets physicians more or less draw new bones on peoplethrough 3-D printing. The pen is loaded with so-called “stem cell ink,” a batch of human cells that can form new bone. Another second substance, a polymer, then seals the area so the stem cells can do their work in peace. You can see why this is promising: if someone loses parts of bone in an accident, a tool like this pen could apply a fix directly to the problem area.

We’ve seen 3-D printed bones before, actually, but this device could give a little more precision. It’s yet to undergo clinical testing, so it still may be a while before it hits the market, but if and when it does, it’ll have some company

source

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

fer1972:

Iconic Album Covers recreated with LEGO Blocks by  Aaron Savage

1. David Bowie – Aladdin Sane

2. Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon

3. Blondie – Parallel Lines

4. Michael Jackson – Thriller

5. The Bee Gees – Saturday Night Fever

6. Bruce Springsteen – Born In The USA

thekidshouldseethis:

From 1941’s Hellzapoppin’, watch this phenomenal performance by Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers, the Savoy Ballroom's supreme swing dance group founded in 1935 by Herbert “Whitey” White. This clip is annotated with the teams’ names: William Downes & Frances “Mickey” Jones (0:39). Billy Ricker & Norma Miller (1:09). Al Minns & Willa Mae Ricker (1:29). Frankie Manning & Ann Johnson (1:55).

You’ll recognize Al Minns from these classic clips with dance partner Leon James. There’s more swing in the archives. Also, don’t miss The Nicholas Brothers in another one of the greatest dance performances ever filmed.

paperswallow:

Photographer Tom Hunter recreates classic paintings in modern, post industrial British settings.

(via blacksheepboy-)